A Brief Respite and Many Thanks

Know how the drudgeries and duties of life sometime step to the forefront and keep us from doing what we want to do? That’s happened here and I’ve spent the past few weeks organizing, purging, cleaning, doing some part-time work to earn a little extra money, and taking care of those unpleasant tasks of life.

As a result, I’ve been away from my blog community. I’ve been nominated for several awards recently; I am humbled and honored by every acknowledgement and nomination, but I’ve not had a chance to accept and to pass on the honor. I plan to take care of that very soon. My thanks and gratitude to each of you who have nominated me.

Tomorrow, it’s back to teaching as fall break is over, but I’m thankful for my brief respite in this beautiful piece of Arizona.

This shot below is taken from one of the more common sites for sunset pictures in Sedona. Tomorrow I’ll explain what I learned from my mistakes in getting the sunset shots.

The rays of the setting sun reflect against the light rain falling on the Red Rocks of Sedona.

My Lesson in Shooting Landscape #2

Clearly this is NOT a landscape shot, but I want to share with you my overly exuberant travel companion. Sophie was NOT happy to be perched on the edge of a small canyon just off of┬áSchnebly Hill Road in Sedona. Check out that expression: “I want to be home on my couch!” I found out that my Sophie, whom I’ve had for about 3 months, gets car-sick.

Below is one of the first shots I took as we (Sophie, car-sick travel companion & I) drove into Sedona. I was excited to see the storm clouds, which provide a dramatic backdrop as the afternoon sun highlights this famous rock formation. I made two mistakes: 1) hand-held camera & 2) ISO 200. I should have used the tripod. It would have taken only a few minutes to dig it out of the back of the pretend SUV (Subaru Forester does not qualify as a full SUV) but I was in a hurry. Hurry for what? In addition, with an f/stop at 13 and shutter speed at 1/80 of a second, I could easily have dropped the ISO to 100 to get a sharper image.

Lesson #2: Take the time to get your gear together and pay attention to the settings. Go with the lowest ISO possible.

Bell Rock, ISO 200, f/13, 1/80 sec, 55 mm.